Sunlight disinfects
Sunshine makes a good disinfectant. Let the sun shine in...
. . .
THE LAW by Frédéric Bastiat [New]
The Law, first published as a pamphlet in June, 1850, is already more than a hundred years old. And because its truths are eternal, it will still be read when another century has passed. Frederic Bastiat (1801-1850) was a French economist, statesman, and author. He did most of his writing during the years just before — and immediately following — the Revolution of February 1848. This was the period when France was rapidly turning to complete socialism. As a Deputy to the Legislative Assembly, Mr. Bastiat was studying and explaining each socialist fallacy as it appeared. And he explained how socialism must inevitably degenerate into communism. But most of his countrymen chose to ignore his logic. The Law is here presented again because the same situation exists in America today as in the France of 1848. The same socialist-communist ideas and plans that were then adopted in France are now sweeping America. The explanations and arguments then advanced against socialism by Mr. Bastiat are — word for word — equally valid today. His ideas deserve a serious hearing.

bastiat.org/en/the_law.html 
COMMON SENSE MASON
Read the Declaration of Independence [New]
We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness...

www.ushistory.org/declaration/document/index.htm 
COMMON SENSE MASON
Constitution 101: Chapter 6--the first 5 chapters were the introduction and background. Now we begin... [New]
by Neal Ross
There is a reason why up until now I have avoided discussing in any detail the particulars of the Constitution itself. My purpose in doing so was to ensure you had, at least, a basic understanding of the how and why it came to be written, and the difficulty in getting the states to ratify it. While it may appear that the Constitution was nothing more than a series of compromises, you would be mistaken in thinking it was something that was haphazardly thrown together. A great deal of care went into establishing a system of government with the various checks and balances you may have heard mentioned in discussions of the Constitution.

www.federalobserver.com/2009/05/25/constitution-101-chapter-vi/#more-2745  090525-neal Ross-constitution 101-chapter 6 
COMMON SENSE MASON
Constitution 101: Chapter 5: We Were Promised A Bill of Rights [New]
by Neal Ross
As my last essay explained, the Constitution had been ratified by the required number of states. However to convince enough states to agree to the ratification the Federalists had made a promise to come up with a Bill, enumerating certain rights that were to be considered sacrosanct, rights which the government could not infringe upon. It cannot be emphasized enough that people were extremely suspicious of any new form of government in which the possibility existed for abuses of power. Therefore, they wanted assurances that this newly established system would not trample upon their rights, and newly gained liberty, as had the British...

www.federalobserver.com/2009/05/20/chapter-v-we-were-promised-a-bill-of-rights/#more-2715  090520-neal Ross-constitution 101-chapter 5 
COMMON SENSE MASON
Constitution 101: Chapter 4--The Battle For Ratification [New]
by Neal Ross
As I explained in my last segment, the Philadelphia Convention was, more often than not, nothing more than a heated argument over the size, scope, and structure of the proposed federal government. Although the delegates were not unanimous in their approval, they did manage to come up with the Constitution as it exists today. Yet it was still merely a piece of parchment with words written upon it. For the Constitution to go into effect it had to be ratified by nine out of thirteen states, as per the requirements contained in Article 7. This was not going to be an easy task, for as we already know that during the Convention there were some that were not happy at all with the new government that this document outlined...

www.federalobserver.com/2009/05/19/chapter-iv-the-battle-for-ratification/#more-2705  090519-neal Ross-constitution 101-chapter 4 
COMMON SENSE MASON
Constitution 101: Chapter 3--An Assembly of Demi-Gods [New]
by Neal Ross
The year was 1787, the city, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. The event was a convention to revise the Articles of Confederation, although for the most part, the delegates attending this monumental meeting of minds realized that a mere revision of the existing Articles would not suffice. The consensus among many was that a completely new document be written to correct the deficiencies of the Articles of Confederation. One historian called it a "Convention of the well-bred, the well-fed, the well-read, and the well-wed." Nevertheless, it could be said that upon the shoulders of these men rested the future of the nation...

www.federalobserver.com/2009/04/27/chapter-iii-an-assembly-of-demi-gods/  090429-neal Ross-constitution 101-chapter 3 
COMMON SENSE MASON
Constitution 101: Chapter 2 [New]
by Neal Ross
It speaks volumes about the mindset of the Continental Congress that it took them only two days to edit and agree upon the final draft of the Declaration of Independence, yet it took more than a year to agree upon a revised, and much weakened, version of the Articles of Confederation. It must be remembered that the blood of their fellow countrymen was still fresh upon the ground at Lexington and Concord, spilled by British soldiers. It was not unreasonable that they would readily agree upon a document proclaiming their independence, yet hesitate to so quickly agree upon a document giving that would grant government anything that might be considered oppressive power. The belief was that if they granted their new government too much power they would merely be replacing one tyrant for another...

www.federalobserver.com/2009/04/24/constitution-101-chapter-ii/#more-2233  090424-neal Ross-constitution 101-chapter 2 
COMMON SENSE MASON
Constitution 101: Chapter 1 [New]
by Neal Ross
Just as the first chapter in the Book of Genesis says, "In the beginning…" I suppose any discussion of the Constitution should start at the beginning as well. The question then arises, when exactly was the beginning? Was the beginning when the Constitution was drafted, or when it was agreed upon by the delegates? Possibly it was when it was ratified by the states, or maybe it was when George Washington was sworn in as our first President? I would venture to guess that most people assume the beginning means when it was ratified by the states. Unfortunately, they would be wrong...

www.federalobserver.com/2009/04/20/constitution-101-chapter-1/  090420-neal Ross-constitution 101-chapter 1 
COMMON SENSE MASON
Constitution 101: _Opening Statements [New]
by Neal Ross
The Constitution for the United States of America is an amazing document. In its entirety it is only four pages long, hand written on parchment, measuring 28 3/4 by 23 5/8 inches, having a grand total of 4,543 words, if you include the signatures of the delegates to the Constitutional Convention. Yet in under 5000 words, the drafters of this document outlined an entire system of government. If you ask me, that is a pretty incredible accomplishment for a document that contains so few words...

www.federalobserver.com/2009/04/19/constitution-101-opening-statements/  090419-neal Ross-consitution 101-opening Statements 
COMMON SENSE MASON
COMMON SENSE by Thomas Paine [New]
Published in 1776, Common Sense challenged the authority of the British government and the royal monarchy. The plain language that Paine used spoke to the common people of America and was the first work to openly ask for independence from Great Britain.
Society is produced by our wants, and government by our wickedness; the former promotes our happiness POSITIVELY by uniting our affections, the latter NEGATIVELY by restraining our vices. The one encourages intercourse, the other creates distinctions. The first is a patron, the last a punisher. Society in every state is a blessing, but Government, even in its best state, is but a necessary evil...

www.ushistory.org/paine/commonsense/singlehtml.htm 
COMMON SENSE MASON
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